Podcasts of ASM named lectures

Pemberton Lecture, 2012: Ethnicity and health – challenges and opportunities

Peter Whincup

The lecture

The population of the UK (and especially of London) is becoming increasingly ethnically diverse. There is strong evidence that prospects for health, and risks of specific diseases, differ markedly between people of different ethnic origins in the UK. This lecture will address both the challenges and opportunities for population-based health research posed by increasing ethnic diversity, and will explore the implications for disease prevention. It will draw on information from a range of earlier investigations, including population-based studies of the health of London children of diverse ethnic origins carried out by the lecturer.

The lecturer

Peter Whincup is an epidemiologist with a background in clinical medicine, based in the Population Health Research Centre at St George’s, University of London where he is Professor of Cardiovascular Epidemiology. His research interests include the epidemiology and prevention of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, which he has studied in people aged between 9 and 90 years, particularly the determinants of geographic and ethnic variations in health and disease.

http://www.sgul.ac.uk/research/researchers/u-z/peter-whincup

http://www.chasestudy.ac.uk/publications

Cochrane Lecture, 2012: The Rise of ‘Patients’ Experiences’: Evidence, Distraction or Final Arbiter?

Sue Ziebland

The lecture

This year’s Lecture will focus on how and why ‘patients’ experiences’ have gained prominence in health services through research, patient reported outcome measures (PROMS), policy developments and as a direct source of information and support to people via the internet. For example, patients’ experiences of treatment and care are increasingly being used to inform clinical guidelines and quality standards and commissioning. This trend will be discussed. The lecture will look, in particular, at how sharing patients’ experiences on the internet might affect people’s health in future or even challenge the way that health services are delivered.

The lecturer

Sue Ziebland is a University Reader in Qualitative Health Research at the University of Oxford and research director of the Health Experiences Research Group, based in the Department of Primary Health Care. She is also a research fellow at Green Templeton College.

Sue’s background is in medical sociology, with increasing focus on qualitative research approaches. She has worked as a researcher in the academic, NHS and voluntary sectors. In 1999 Sue was invited (by Ann McPherson) to be involved in DIPEx (now Healthtalkonline) when it was at a very early stage. Healthtalkonline now provides access to audio and video interviews of more than 2,000 people’s experiences of over 70 health-related conditions and illnesses. Sue and the research group work closely with the DIPEx charity and the growing DIPEx International collaboration (Japan, Australia, Spain, Germany, Korea, Netherlands, Israel and Canada).

Sue’s research interests include people’s use of the internet for health information and qualitative research methods (which she teaches at various levels). She is principal investigator on a 5-year NIHR programme on the use of patients’ experiences on the internet, working with colleagues at Warwick, Northumbria, Sheffield and Oxford universities.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s